Flight 93 Logo
The Memorial
When completed, the Flight 93 National Memorial will be the only unit of the national park system chronicling the events and personalities of September 11, 2001.  Creating a place that not only remembers the 40 heroes of Flight 93 but also inspires ordinary citizens to act in their own heroic ways is what the Flight 93 National Memorial will be about.  See renderings below of the design elements that will provide a complete visitor experience among 2,200 acres of dedicated park lands surrounding the crash site of Flight 93.

Sacred Ground

SACRED GROUND: As the final resting place of the passengers and crew, the Sacred Ground is the heart of the Flight 93 National Memorial. A viewing plaza will allow visitors to get closer-than-ever to the meadow and hemlock grove which absorbed much of the devastating impact of the crash.

Field of Honor

FIELD OF HONOR: Measuring one-half mile in diameter and covering over 150 acres immediately adjacent to the Sacred Ground, the bowl-shaped Field of Honor links the entire memorial through sightlines and pathways. Once a surface coal mine, the field will be “rehabilitated” through the sustainable planting of native grasses and a mix of indigenous wildflowers.

Sacred Ground

WETLANDS: A series of wetlands and ponds adjacent to the Sacred Ground will be preserved as natural features in the design and construction of the memorial. One of the “leftovers” from the surface mining activities, the wetlands will be transformed into a self-sustaining natural habitat and aquatic eco-system for local flora and fauna to reside and thrive.

Sacred Ground

40 MEMORIAL GROVES: Creating a living memorial to the 40 heroes of Flight 93 within the memorial is the objective of planting the 40 Memorial Groves. Each grove will contain 40 trees, such as Sugar Maple, White Oak, and Elm, for a total of 1,600 trees radiating toward the center of the Field of Honor.

Sacred Ground

ENTRY PORTAL: The Entry Portal, set along the final trajectory of Flight 93, will immediately bring visitors back to 10:00 am on September 11, 2001 when Flight 93 careened in this direction toward a stand of hemlock trees. After passing through the twin walls framing the sky, visitors will be standing at an overlook with a sweeping view of the Field of Honor.

Sacred Ground

WESTERN OVERLOOK: The Western Overlook provides a key vantage point to view the entire memorial site. Years ago, the mining operations kept an equipment repair and parts shop at this location and, immediately after the crash of Flight 93, the Federal Bureau of Investigation set up its command post at this location.

Sacred Ground

VISITOR CENTER AND LEARNING CENTER: The Visitor Center and Learning Center will be the educational hubs of the memorial. The drama and tragedy of Flight 93 will be chronicled through traditional and interactive exhibits using the latest audio and video technology, primary source materials, photographs, and oral history testimony from those who were there. On-site education and distance-learning resources will create an extensive forum where visitors, families, and school groups can discuss the legacy of Flight 93 and what it means to be a hero.

Sacred Ground

TOWER OF VOICES: Tall enough to be seen from the highway, the Tower of Voices will mark the entry to and exit from the park. Reaching 93 feet into the sky, the tower will house 40 aluminum wind chimes, which will serve as an audible reminder of the selfless acts of courage of the passengers and crew, many of whose last contact from Flight 93 was through their voices on phone calls.

National Park Service Logo

National Park Foundation Logo MEDIA CONTACT: VICTORIA TAGLIABUE | VTAGLIABUE@NATIONALPARKS.ORG | 202-354-6488

Flight 93 National Memorial Campaign c/o National Park Foundation
1201 Eye Street, NW, Suite 550B, Washington, DC 20005
202.354.6488 / 202.371.2066 Fax / flight93memorial@nationalparks.org
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